CSA

CSA Network

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Not Wholesale--Whole community!

Just Food's CSA Network affirms common values that celebrate the most meaningful elements of the CSA model. Urban groups and farmers in our network are committed to supporting local, sustainable agriculture, fostering community, fighting for a just food system, and upholding the CSA model--a model that has the power to transform economies, communities, and lives through food.

How to Start a CSA

 

Thinking about how to connect with a farmer and bring fresh, local, organically grown vegetables to your neighborhood? Join Just Food for one of our How To Start a CSA workshops and learn about:

Outside NYC

Currently, Just Food does not work with CSAs beyond New York City.  To find a CSA outside of our network, check Local Harvest.

HOW TO START A CSA IN NYC

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File 1740  File 1741  File 1743

Interested in starting a CSA in your area? Just Food can help!

CSA RESOURCE CENTER

Welcome to the CSA Resource Center!

Learn more about CSA through our Resource Center, where you will find:

  • Tipsheets that will guide you through the process of starting and managing a CSA project in NYC
  • Videos that will provide tips to better manage your CSA

Meet the members of the Greenpoint-Williamsburg CSA in our "Welcome to CSA" video:

HISTORY

CSA is a relatively recent phenomenon in the United States and Canada. A CSA equivalent, called teikei, which literally translated means "partnership" or "cooperation", was first developed in Japan by a group of women concerned with the use of pesticides, the increase in processed and imported foods and the corresponding decrease in the farm population. The more philosophical translation for teikei is "food with the farmer's face" (Van En 1992). In 1965, these women initiated a direct, cooperative relationship in which local farmers were supported by consumers on an annual basis.1

WHAT IS CSA?

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CSA Stands for Community Supported Agriculture

 
CSA allows city residents to have direct access to high quality, fresh produce grown locally by regional farmers.
 
When you become a member of a CSA, you’re purchasing a “share” of vegetables from a regional farmer.

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